Javier D. Donna

Howard P. Marvel Scholar Assistant Professor of Economics

COURSES AT OHIO STATE


2016/2017:
  • Econ 8872: Graduate Empirical IO (Ph.D. course in the IO field)
  • Econ 5700: Industrial Organization (upper-level undergraduate, calculus-based)
  • Econ 4700: Government and Business (upper-level undergraduate, without calculus)
2015/2016:
  • Econ 8872: Graduate Empirical IO (Ph.D. course in the IO field)
  • Econ 5700: Industrial Organization (upper-level undergraduate, calculus-based)
  • Econ 4700: Government and Business (upper-level undergraduate, without calculus)

2014/2015:

  • Econ 8872: Graduate Empirical IO (Ph.D. course in the IO field)
  • Econ 5700: Industrial Organization (upper-level undergraduate, calculus-based)
  • Econ 4001.01: Intermediate Microeconomics Theory (medium-level undergraduate, without calculus)

2013/2014:

  • Econ 8872: Graduate Empirical IO (Ph.D. course in the IO field)
  • Econ 8894.03: Graduate Colloquium in Empirical IO (Ph.D. colloquium)
  • Econ 4700: Government and Business (upper-level undergraduate, without calculus)
  • Econ 4001.01: Intermediate Microeconomics Theory (medium-level undergraduate, without calculus)

2012/2013:

  • Econ 8894.03: Graduate Colloquium in Empirical IO (Ph.D. colloquium)
  • Econ 4700: Government and Business (upper-level undergraduate, without calculus)
  • Econ 4001.01: Intermediate Microeconomics Theory (medium-level undergraduate, without calculus)


COURSES' DESCRIPTION


GRADUATE EMPIRICAL IO
Econ 8872
(Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014, Spring 2014)

Course Overview:
This course provides a graduate level introduction to empirical Industrial Organization. It is designed to provide a broad introduction to topics and industries that current researchers are studying as well as to expose students to a wide variety of techniques. It will start the process of preparing economics Ph.D. students to conduct thesis research in the area, and may also be of interest to doctoral students in other fields. In the first part of the class we will study Econometric Methods for Demand Estimation and for the Analysis of Auction Data.
| Syllabus|


COLLOQUIUM IN EMPIRICAL IO
Econ 8894.03

(Spring 2013, Fall 2013)

Course Overview:
This course will review major contributions and recent developments in structural industrial organization. We will cover some classical papers, as well as more recent working papers. The meetings will be a mixture of lectures and discussions of pre-assigned papers. The discussion will be lead by a student, who will present the paper, with the expectation that everyone reads the paper in advance and participates. Students will also be strongly encouraged to present preliminary work of their own. The reading list below covers recent developments in the field including general methodological discussions, advances in demand estimation, dynamics and estimation using moment inequalities. They are meant mainly as a suggested base for discussion. Other topics will be introduced as needed.

| Syllabus|


INDUSTRIAL ORGANIZATION
Econ 5700
(Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014)

Course Overview:
The course is an introduction to modern industrial organization (IO). IO is the field of economics that studies how firms behave, how markets are structured, and how they interact with each other. The course combines the latest theories with empirical evidence about the organization of firms and markets. I discuss issues that arise from the market structure (such as price discrimination and strategic behavior), the role of information and advertisement, and the government's role in regulation.
| Syllabus|

GOVERNMENT AND BUSINESS
Econ 4700
(Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Spring 2014, Fall 2012)
Course Overview:
The course is an introduction to the role of government in different industries, business practices, and market failures. Some of the topics discussed include externalities, the value of life, environmental regulation, the regulation of workplace safety, pharmaceuticals and patents, and the regulation of the internet..
| Syllabus|


INTERMEDIATE MICROECONOMICS THEORY
Econ 4001.01
(Fall 2014, Spring 2014, Fall 2012)
Course Overview:
This course is an introductory class to modern microeconomics theory. The course is aimed at providing you with deeper knowledge of the various aspects of consumer and firm behavior, how markets are structured, and how they interact with each other. We will combine the latest theories with empirical evidence about consumption decisions of individuals, the organization of firms and markets. We will discuss issues that arise from the market structure and business practices—such as price discrimination and strategic behavior—, the role of information and advertisement, and the government's role when markets fail.
| Syllabus|


ECONOMICS OF REGULATION AND ANTITRUST
Econ 4700H

(New Course Approved in Fall 2014)

Honors Program 
Course Overview:
The objective of the course is to introduce you to the economic reasoning tools to analyze regulatory and antitrust issues. We will depart from the traditional emphasis on institutions to ask how economic theory and empirical analyses can illuminate the character of market operation and the role for government action. We will bring together new developments in theory and empirical methodology to bear on these questions. In the introduction we will focus on regulation and the role of government. Then, in Part I, we will study antitrust, focusing on the advances in economic theory and recent antitrust cases (e.g., the case against Microsoft and the Supreme Court's Kodak decision). On Part II, on economic regulation, we will study public enterprise, natural monopoly regulation (e.g., electric power) and its dynamic issues (e.g., telecommunications), regulation of transportation services (e.g., surface freight and airlines) and the problems of regulation (e.g., the U.K. railway privatization or California’s electricity crisis). Finally, in Part III, on social regulation, we will discuss externalities, the value of life, environmental regulation (e.g., clan air, global commons), the regulation of workplace safety, pharmaceuticals and patents, and the regulation of the internet (e.g., should the state have protected Napster?)

| Syllabus|

Course materials are available on the class website Carmen (student access only).